My Blog

Posts for: May, 2018

By Designing Smiles By Dr. Diaz
May 25, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   dentures  
TakeYourDenturesoutatNighttoExtendTheirUsefulness

There's no doubt about it — dentures have changed your life. Now you can eat and speak normally, and smile again with confidence. But if you're going to continue to benefit from your dentures, you'll need to take care of them. One of the best things you can do is not sleep with them in.

There are a couple of important reasons why you should take your dentures out when you go to bed. First, dentures tend to compress the bony ridges of the gums that support them. This contributes to the loss of the underlying bone, an occurrence common with missing teeth. Wearing dentures around the clock can accelerate this bone loss, which eventually loosens your denture fit.

Constant denture wearing also contributes to mouth conditions conducive to dental disease. You're more likely to develop tongue and denture plaque (a thin film of bacteria and food particles) that can cause gum inflammation or yeast development. The presence of the latter could also trigger a chronic response from your immune system that might make you more susceptible to other diseases.

Good oral hygiene is just as important with dentures as with natural teeth. Besides removing them at night, you should also take them out and rinse them after eating and brush them at least once a day with a soft tooth brush. And be sure to use regular dish or hand soap (especially antibacterial) or denture cleanser — toothpaste is too abrasive for denture surfaces.

It's also a good habit to store your dentures in water or, better, an alkaline peroxide solution. This will help deter plaque and yeast development. And don't forget the rest of your mouth: brush your tongue and gums with a very soft toothbrush (different from your denture brush) or clean them off with a damp cloth.

Taking care of your dentures will ensure two things. You'll lower your risk for disease — and you'll also help extend your dentures' life and fit.

If you would like more information on caring for your dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Designing Smiles By Dr. Diaz
May 15, 2018
Category: Oral Health
3ThingstoConsiderforLoweringYourChildsRiskforCavities

From the moment your child's first tooth appears, usually between six and nine months, you need to be concerned about Early Childhood Caries (ECC). This particular form of tooth decay can have a devastating effect on primary (baby) teeth and lead to their premature demise. Losing one before its time could adversely affect how the future permanent tooth comes in.

You can help prevent ECC with daily brushing and cleaning, regular dental visits (beginning around their first birthday) and limiting the sugar they eat. Here are 3 more things to consider for boosting your prevention efforts.

Breastfeeding. Pediatricians generally recommend breastfeeding if possible for a baby's overall health, including dental development. And although breast milk contains fermentable carbohydrates that boost bacterial growth, it no more promotes tooth decay than similar foods and beverages. That said, though, once the child begins to eat and drink other foods and beverages, the combination of sugars in them and breast milk could increase the bacteria that causes ECC. This is another good reason to wean the child from breast milk as they begin to eat more solid foods.

Bottles and pacifiers. It's quite common for parents and caregivers to soothe a fussing or crying baby with a bottle filled with formula, milk or juice for sipping, or even a pacifier dipped in jam, sugar or some form of sweetener. But these practices can create an environment that promotes high acid production from bacteria feeding on the sugars. Instead, avoid giving them a “prop-up” bottle filled with liquids containing sugar and try to limit bottle use to mealtimes. And provide them pacifiers without sugary additives if you use them.

Medicines. Children with chronic illnesses or other needs often take medication containing sugar or with antihistamines that reduce the flow of acid-neutralizing saliva. If the medications can't be altered, then it's extra important for you to practice diligent, daily hygiene to reduce the effect of higher mouth acid.

If you would like more information on dental disease prevention in babies and young children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Age One Dental Visit: Why it's Important for Your Baby.”


By Designing Smiles By Dr. Diaz
May 05, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: anesthesia  
LocalAnesthesiaEliminatesPainCompletelyDuringDentalWork

Your teeth and gums are filled with nerves that make the mouth one of the most sensitive areas in the body. But thanks to local anesthesia, you won't feel a thing during your next dental procedure.

The word anesthesia means “without feeling or pain.” General anesthesia accomplishes this with drugs that place the patient in an unconscious state. It's reserved for major surgery where the patient will be closely monitored for vital signs while in that state.

The other alternative is local anesthesia, which numbs the area that needs treatment, while allowing the patient to remain conscious. The anesthetics used in this way are applied either topically (with a swab, adhesive patch or spray) or injected with a needle.

In dentistry, we use both applications. Topical anesthesia is occasionally used for sensitive patients before superficial teeth cleaning, but most often as an “opening act” to injected anesthesia: the topical application numbs the gums so you can't feel the prick of the needle used for the injectable anesthetic. By using both types, you won't feel any pain at all during your visit.

Because of possible side effects, we're careful about what procedures will involve the use of local anesthesia. Placing a sealant on the exterior of a tooth or reshaping enamel doesn't require it because we're not making contact with the more sensitive dentin layer beneath. We've also seen advances in anesthetic drugs in which we can now better control the length of time numbness will persist after the procedure.

All in all, though, local anesthesia will make your dental care more comfortable — both for you and for us. Knowing you're relaxed and comfortable allows us to work with ease so we can be unhurried and thorough. By keeping pain out of the equation, your dental care has a better chance for a successful outcome.

If you would like more information on managing discomfort during dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Local Anesthesia for Pain-Free Dentistry.”